The Beginners Guide To Running Strides

Running Strides

Looking to improve your running speed and form?

Look no further than running strides.

Performing strides is a convenient way to introduce your body to faster pace and speedwork, prepare for a tough session, or loosen up after an easy workout.

In other words, by adding strides to your running routine, you’ll be making strides towards your running goals.

So, what exactly are strides?

And why are they so important?

That’s what we’re are going to answer in today’s post.

In today’s post, we’ll see why, as well as how to incorporate them the right way into your weekly running routine.

Sounds good?

Let’s get started.

What Are Running Strides?

Whether you’re a 10K beginner, cross country athlete, or training for 9th marathon, strides are key for building coordination and speed—the kind you need to reach your full running potential.

Also known as accelerations, strides involve performing 10K accelerations where you kick it off at a jog, build to roughly 95 percent of your max speed, and then gradually slow to a stop.

It should you roughly 20 to 30 seconds to complete one stride, depending, of course, on your fitness level and speed.

Why Runners Need Strides

Strides have a lot to offer.

Here’s how they improve your running performance.

  • Speed work. A great way to add speed to your workout schedule without having to sacrifice the whole day of training. Strides also get your body ready to run fast and hard before a hard workout or race.
  • Help you improve technique. Improve the running economy by reinforcing proper running techniques, making you more efficient in the process. Increase stride length
  • Strides can only take a few minutes. What I like the most about strides is that they only take a few minutes, but help you to drastically improve your running. They can also be done anywhere—provided that you have enough space.

The How

Begin by finding a predictably flat surface that’s long enough to run 30 seconds at speed—or roughly 250 to 300 feet for most.

A track is a great place to start, but if you don’t have access to one, look for a long patch in a local park or dead-end stress away from traffic.

Kick off the stride by running easy for five seconds, focusing on quick and short stride, and then gradually pick up the pace by lengthening your stride.

Once you get to the three-quarter of the distance, gradually slow it down by shortening your strides until you come to a jog.

At the end of the strides, walk it out for one to two minutes to bring your heart rate down before you start the drill.

female running doing running strides
Female sport runner striving into bright future. Fit body requires hard work. Urban sport concept.

Your Form

Form also matters when doing strides.

Make sure to run tall with good posture while keeping your back flat, core engaged, and lean slightly forward from the ankle.

Run relaxed.

Run loose.

Don’t let tension creep up anywhere in your body.

Focus on letting your body do the work and staying relaxed.

Unclench your jaw, lets your checks dangle, don’t let your arms flail, loosen up your shoulders, and aim to land on your midfoot—near your toes—instead of your heel.

When and How Many Strides

Strides can be incorporated into a workout routine in several different ways.

You can use strides as part of your warm-up to help increase your heart rate and get the blood flowing to your running muscles—all of which help you improve performance.

You can also add them into weekly runs, usually easy runs, at part of your speed workout.

To get these benefits and some more, try doing strides for a few weeks then see how you feel.

In general, perform strides two times a week, do 4 to 8 strides of roughly 20 to 30 seconds.

Conclusion

There you have it.

Incorporating strides to your running program is as simple as that.

They’re easy to implement and can help achieve great progress toward your running goals.

The rest is just details.

Please feel free to leave your comments and questions in the section below.

In the meantime, thank you for dropping by.

Keep running strong.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here