The 8-Week Beginner Running Plan

Free beginner running plan schedule

Thinking about getting into running but not sure how to take the first steps? Then start running the easy way with my free beginner running plan.

Not only does running improve your endurance, strength, and fitness, but it can also improve your emotional state and strengthen your brain. It’s an excellent fat-burner and even reduces your risk of disease.

I can go on and on about the benefits of running, but that’s another subject for another day (or check this article).

That said, it takes a lot of courage to take your first steps and a lot of patience to keep going. Fret no more. In this article, I’m sharing with you my free running plan for beginners, which consists of an 8-week program designed to help you turn into a runner without getting hurt.

Sounds like a good deal?

Let’s get started.

Start Slow

I see most beginner runners make a common mistake: doing too much too soon. This, as you can guess, can lead to injury or burnout, sometimes both. You’re begging for nagging issues such as Runners Knee, stress fractures, and other problems if you keep doing this.

Not just beginners who are guilty of this. Even for those already in decent shape, have perfect technique, and have $200 shoes, running will always be a high-intensity, high-impact exercise.

Not much we can do about that.

So what should you do?

Simple. Start your beginner running programme slow. That’s where the rule of gradual progress comes into the picture.

Here’s the truth.

If you’re not willing to follow this rule, you shouldn’t bother running—or doing any other form of exercise—as you’ll only end up hurting yourself.

Get injured early on, and your interest will fizzle, and you’ll give up.

I bet that’s not what you want, right?

The goal of my free beginner running plan is to help you take small, consistent steps instead of erratic giant leaps. Running is convenient and requires no technical instruction, but that does not mean it’s easy. Your body needs time to adapt.

That’s a key principle for injury-free and effective training—whether you’re a running newbie or an elite Olympic weightlifter.

And becoming a full-time runner does not happen overnight. It requires patience and gradual progress. You didn’t become a complete couch potato in 4 weeks, so you shouldn’t expect to get in shape in 4 weeks.

The fact is, it takes around three months of regular training for your ligaments, tendons, joints, and muscles to adjust to the high-impact forces of running.

Try to skip this, and you’ll, sooner or later, end up hurt.

So, progress slowly. For example, aim to increase your actual running time by no more than three to five minutes from one session to the next.

How Long Does it Take?

Sorry, I don’t have the EXACT answer because every runner is different and responds differently to the high-impact stress of running.

Every runner is unique—with every meaning of the word.

In other words, it all depends on the individual.

To give you some perspective, the following are the factors to consider when determining how long it should take you to become a runner.

  • Your current shape—or how to fit you where before you take up running.
  • Your age. The younger you are, the quicker you can get in shape.
  • Your current body weight. If you are overweight or many pounds heavier, then chances are it’s going to take you a little bit longer than someone with a healthy weight.
  • Your running programme. If you follow my free beginner running plan, there’s a strong chance you can make ASAP.

The Run-Walk Method

Before you embark on my beginner running plan, make sure you can walk for 45 to 60 minutes at a time.

If that’s not the case, I’d recommend that you start by walking for 20 to 30 minutes daily, then increase that time gradually.

Once you can briskly walk for one hour, you’re ready to add some running.

But how would you go about that?

Simple. Enter the walk-run method.

As far as I can tell, the walk-run method is the easiest way to become a runner without getting hurt.

The brainchild of Jeff Galloway, a legendary running guru, this method can help you build enough cardiovascular power to run straight for extended periods without risking injury and/or overtraining.

So what is it all about?

The run-walk method mixes running/jogging and walking for set periods. For example, you alternate one minute of jogging with one minute of walking for 20 to 30 minutes.

As you get fitter, you simply increase the time spent running while shortening the duration and frequency of your walk breaks. And voila!

Additional resource – How to run a faster mile

Walking to Running Ratios

To make the most out of the walk/run method, you’d need to choose the right recipe to follow. And that entirely depends on your starting point.

Here are three walk-to-running ratios to experiment with. Pick the Ratio that feels the most appropriate for you.

  • The Newbie: Jog for 20 to 30 seconds. Then walk for one to two minutes
  • The Intermediate: Jog for three to five minutes. Then take a two to three minutes walking break.
  • The Experienced: Jog for eight to ten minutes. Then walk for 30-second to one full minute.

What’s more?

Another thing to keep in mind is to take walk breaks before the no-return point; otherwise, it might be too late for you to keep going.

The Conversational Pace

Your training intensity also matters when following the walk-run method. That’s why, as a rule, run at an easy pace during the running intervals.

Your pace should be only slightly faster than your walking pace. This should be slower than you might think. And then slower still.

To achieve this, most experts recommend sticking to a conversational pace, the pace at which you keep a conversation with your buddy while running without much trouble. This is considered moderate-intensity pace, or around 60 to 70 percent maximum heart rate.

Enter the Talk Test

This is the best way to monitor your training pace and effort. The Talk Test has been around for decades and is still here because it’s simple and works like a charm.

The principle is, that if you can carry on a conversation with your training partner while training, you’re not overly challenging your cardiovascular system.

You’re running too hard if you’re huffing and puffing your way through. You should be able to recite the Pledge of Allegiance without much trouble.

Distance Matters

TIME first, DISTANCE later. Make that your motto.

I hate to sound like a broken record, but only add distance and intensity once your body has properly adjusted to running’s high impact.

Remember that you have the rest of your life to work on getting fit. Don’t let unrealistic expectations dictate the pace of your workouts.

Rest

Do not ignore recovery days. They are as vital to fitness progress as the training itself. They are also essential for preventing injury and burnout.

So, as a rule of thumb, take plenty of rest between workouts, with two days off every week.

For more on proper recovery, check my article here.

My running Plan For Beginners  – The Instructions

The ideal beginner program consists of 3 workouts a week.

You don’t have to run on specific days; however, you shouldn’t be running two days in a row. Either take a complete rest day or opt for cross-training on recovery days.

Cross-training can be cycling, yoga, swimming, or any other exercises other than running that you enjoy.

If this beginner program is too much for you, slow it down and repeat the workouts before cranking up the intensity.

Note: if you can already run for more than half an hour with ease, then skip this. You also need to make sure you have the right running shoes for the job.

The 8-Week Running Plan For Beginners

This eight-week program is designed to take you from a complete beginner to being able to run a 5K distance comfortably

My beginner plan assumes that you’re a beginner runner who can already walk briskly for one hour four to six times per week. If that’s out of the realm of possibility, I’d recommend starting with a walking plan first.

Note: if you can already run for more than half an hour with ease, then skip this.

Experienced runners may up the ante by doing other forms of running, such as sprints, hill reps, or working on increasing mileage for the long run.

P.S – You can also Try this couch to 5K plan.

Beginner Running Plan – Week 1:

Warm up by walking for 5 minutes at a brisk pace.

Then alternate running for one minute at an easy pace followed by three minutes of brisk walking.

Example: Run 1-minute, walk 3-minute.

Repeat the cycle 5 to 7 times.

Finish off the sessions with a 5-minute easy walk.

Do three sessions per week.

Beginner Running Plan – Week 2:

Run 2-minute, walk 2-minute. Repeat six times.

Do three workouts.

Beginner Running Plan – Week 3:

Run 3-minute, walk 1-minute. Repeat five times.

Do three workouts.

Beginner Running Plan – Week 4:

Run 5-minute, walk 90-second. Repeat four times.

Do three workouts.

Beginner Running Plan  – Week 5:

Run 8-minute, walk 1-minute. Repeat three times. Do three workouts.

Beginner Running Plan  – Week 6:

Run 12-minute, walk 1-minute. Repeat three times. Do three workouts.

Beginner Running Plan  – Week 7:

Run 15-minute, walk 1-minute and run another 15-minute. Do three workouts.

Beginner Running Plan  – Week 8:

Run 30-minute at an easy and controlled pace. Do TWO workouts.

This is a basic beginner plan, so feel free to adjust this program to meet your own needs and fitness level.

More Resources for The Beginner Runner

For more beginner running advice, check some of my posts here:

That’s it for today.

Please make sure to take action and remember to always stay within your fitness level. I hope my free running program for beginners has you covered.

Thank you for reading this short post.

Cheers.

The Stronger Runner: Unveiling the Secrets of Effective Strength Training

Attention, runners seeking to unleash their inner powerhouse! Get ready to dive headfirst into the ultimate treasure trove of weight training wisdom specifically designed to elevate your running game!

In this post, I’m about to unravel the full-fledged guide that will revolutionize the way you approach weight training. Get ready to embark on a journey thatwill take you from novice to seasoned pro, leaving no stone unturned.

By the time we cross the finish line, your mind will be filled with an abundance of knowledge.

Brace yourself to discover the incredible benefits of weightlifting tailored to runners like yourself.

We’ll explore the latest cutting-edge research, unveiling the secrets behind strength training as the ultimate shield against those pesky injuries that threaten to derail your running dreams.

Sounds great?

Let’s get started.

What’s Strength Training?

Imagine yourself as a runner on a long-distance race. You’ve been training for months, but as you hit the halfway mark, you feel the fatigue setting in. Your muscles ache, your form starts to falter, and your pace slows down. But what if I told you that there’s a way to break through that plateau and reach your running goals faster? Enter strength training.

Strength training is the secret weapon for runners looking to improve their speed, efficiency, and endurance. It involves using external resistance, such as weights or resistance bands, to challenge your muscles to adapt and get stronger. And the benefits are not just limited to physical performance.

Research on Strength Training for runners And Injury Prevention

Studies have shown that weightlifting can reduce injury risks and fix muscle imbalances caused by the repetitive motion of running.

In fact, a study published by the National Strength & Conditioning Association found that weightlifting strengthens muscles and joints, leading to proper form, improved running time, and reduced injury risks. Another study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning revealed that exercises like squats and single-leg hops not only help reduce injury risks but also improve performance.

But that’s not all. Strength training can also help you burn more calories. Many runners turn to running as a means of weight loss, but as their bodies adapt, they start burning fewer calories. Incorporating strength training into your routine can help increase your lean muscle mass, which in turn boosts your body’s ability to shed more calories.

Run Faster

Resistance training puts stress on your body, forcing it to adapt to boost its ability to withstand the extra load.

Over time, with regular training, these stress-induced adaptations can have an enormous impact on your running speed, efficiency, and endurance.

So, for instance, the stronger your leg muscles get, the more force you can generate on each stride and the more distance you can travel on each foot strike.

Plus, stronger shoulders and arms are essential in increasing your speed and form efficiency.

Fix Muscle Imbalances

Running is one-directional action, meaning it works some muscles more than others, leading to the onset of muscle imbalances.

This places excessive pressure on ligaments and tendons, reducing stride efficiency, limiting running economy, and increasing the risks of injury.

Research shows that, often than not, many runners nagging issues, such as shin splints, runners knee, Achilles tendinitis, etc., stem from muscle imbalances.

With all that being said, the good news is, as little as six weeks of proper weight training can reduce, or completely alleviate knee pain, according to a study.

Burns More Calories

Many runners took up running as means of weight loss. And as my experience dictates, running is helpful for shedding the pounds—especially during the first few months of training.

That said, once your body gets used to running (especially if you lack variety in your training), it’ll start to burn fewer calories.

For that reason, you might want to back up your running for weight loss training with a well-rounded and intense strength training schedule.

As a matter of fact, by increasing your lean muscle mass, you’ll boost your body’s ability to shed more calories.

Build Stronger Bones

In addition to helping you prevent injury, improve running performance, build muscle, and lose fat, weight lifting also improves bone density.

This can be typically measured using a DEXA scan, which is similar to an x-ray but more thorough.

But how does strength training make bones stronger?

It’s actually quite simple.

By stressing your bones, strength training can increase bone density, therefore, reducing the risks of bone-related issues.

That’s it.

This is especially the case for us runners as stress fractures—a common overuse injury—is every runner’s worst nightmare.

For the full scope on a stress fracture, check my full guide here.

Strong Arms

Have you ever tried running without using your arms? It’s not a good idea.

Swinging your arms faster automatically increases your step frequency, and vice versa.

We pump our arms as we run, and the stronger our arms are, the more powerful the forward drive, and the faster we move forward.

That’s no secret.

Be More Efficient

Running doesn’t just involve relying on the leg for forward propulsion, but we’re also using our core, back, arms, shoulders, and chest to balance and improve efficiency.

When the legs are exhausted, we use the upper body more because of the kinetic chain.

Everything is working together in one interlocked system.

Better Form

Your running form can ultimately make or break you as a runner.

That’s why if you can’t hold proper form throughout your runs, you’ll never reach your full running potential.

Improving your upper body strength can make your posture more efficient and help you keep a consistent form, especially as fatigue starts to set in.

Fortunately, improving upper-body strength can upgrade your technique and help you keep consistent form.

Signs of a bad form may include:

  • Rounding the shoulders,
  • Shrugging the shoulder near the ears,
  • Holding on to tension,
  • Swinging the arms too widely,
  • Holding a cell phone or water bottle,

But when you keep your posture straight, head held high, shoulder loose and square, and your arms functioning properly, you’ll ensure that you won’t get hurt.

What’s more?

A stronger upper body, especially a well-developed back, and core muscles help protect your spine from the impact of running.

Additional Resource – Here’s another strength training program for runners to check out

It Requires Little Time

You don’t need to train like an elite bodybuilder or CrossFitter to reap the benefits of strength training.

In fact, all you need is no more than a 30- to 45-minute session two to three times per week, to reap the benefits of strength training as a runner.

Here is the full guide on starting strength training for runners.

Note: Strength training should be performed according to your fitness level and training goals.

For that reason, you need to opt for a well-rounded strength program designed specifically to meet your running needs.

This is why a sprinter strength routine can look so different from a long-distance athlete program.

Are you looking for a way to take your running to the next level? Look no further than strength training! And the best part? It doesn’t require hours upon hours of time in the gym. In fact, all you need is 30-45 minutes, two to three times per week, to start seeing the benefits of strength training as a runner.

Muscles Anatomy

Your body is a complicated piece of machinery, and muscles are a huge part of what’s driving it.

According to experts, five main groups of muscles are used while running—quads, hamstrings, hip flexors, gluteals, and calf muscles.

Your body also uses secondary muscles to keep you going forward, such as the core and upper body muscles. 

These typically provide stability throughout the gait cycle and improve speed and running economy.

The Quadriceps

The quadriceps, the muscles on the front of the thighs, are in charge of forward leg movement.  Also known as the quads, these run from the hips down to the kneecap and are composed of four muscles:

  • The Vastus Medialis,
  • Intermedius,
  • Lateralus, and
  • Rectus Femoris.

The Hamstrings

The hamstrings consist of a single large tendon located at the back of the thigh and play a key role in standing, walking, or running, as well as hip extension and knee flexion. These muscles are comprised of

  • The biceps femoris,
  • The Semitendinosus, and
  • The Semimembranosus.

The Gluteals

Consisting of a group of three muscles, the gluteals are located in the buttocks and are responsible for hip extension, posture and proper knee alignment, and leg stability. The glutes consist of the following:

  • The Gluteus Maximus,
  • The Gluteus medius, and
  • The Gluteus minimus.

The Hip Flexors

The hip flexors, while smaller in size, play a crucial role in our everyday movements. From walking to squatting, these muscles are constantly activated, which is why it’s important to keep them strong and flexible.

Tight hip flexors can lead to discomfort and even pain, while a strong and healthy hip flexor group can improve posture, stability, and overall athletic performance.

The Calves

Located on the back of the lower leg, just below the knees, the calves are another supercritical running muscles.

Why? These provide spring in your step, extend and flex each foot as you land and push off, and maintain lower body balance and coordination. The calves consist of:

  • The large gastrocnemius, or outer calf; and
  • The smaller soleus, or inner calf.

Research has shown that incorporating exercises that specifically target these muscle groups can have a significant impact on running performance. In a study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, researchers found that a six-week strength training program targeting the glutes and hip flexors led to improved running economy and performance in female distance runners.

The Best Strength Exercises For Runners

Try adding this powerful routine to your easy or cross-training days. The workout will take roughly 45 minutes to complete and can be done twice a week. That’s a small amount of time to invest in a big payoff.

I’ve also provided you with YouTube tutorials showing you exactly how to do each exercise. Proper form is king! For a better grip, try out this liquid chalk.

1. Planks

One of the core exercises that ended up becoming a staple in my training was the plank.

It’s one of the best core exercises because it targets every aspect of the core, as well as the lower back and shoulders.

Proper Form

  1. Lie on your stomach
  2. Prop yourself up on your elbow with feet slightly apart, toes hip distance apart with shoulders directly above the elbows
  3. Aim to straighten your whole body, so it’s forming a straight line from the top of your head to your heels.
  4. While engaging your core and keeping a straight line (your butt should not stick up in the air), hold the position for 30 seconds to a full minute.

As you get stronger, you should gradually add more time.

You can also make it more challenging for yourself by placing a weight plate on your back.

2. Russian Twists

The Russian twist targets a bunch of muscles, including the abs, obliques, lower back and your hamstrings as well.

You can use a medicine ball or a plate for extra resistance.

Proper Form

  1. Grab a weight, then lie on your back with your upper legs perpendicular to the floor and your knees bent at a 90-degree angle.
  2. Hold the weight in front of your body while keeping your back straight.
  3. Twist your torso as far as you can to the right side, tap the weight on the floor, then reverse your motion to the other side.

3. Overhead Lunges

The overhead lunge targets the whole body—quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, shoulders and core muscles.

It’s the perfect fit-it-all-in move, so it’s great if you’re pressed for time.

It also increases flexibility and mobility in your hip flexors.

Proper Form

  1. Hold a pair of dumbbells or a weighted bar above your shoulder, with your arms straight, and your elbow locked, feet shoulder-width apart, and knees slightly bent.
  2. While holding the weight directly overhead, step forward with your right leg into a deep lunge position, bending both your knees.
  3. Return to the starting position and repeat on the other side. That’s one repetition.

Do 12 steps on each side to complete one set.

4. Air Squats

Bodyweight squats are some of the best strength exercises you can do.  These should be an integral part in any runner’s strength-oriented training program.

Squats target a lot of running-specific muscles.

They are convenient to do, and can easily be added to your post-run routine.

Proper Form

  1. Stand with your feet hip-distance apart with your toes facing forward
  2. With your arms out in front at shoulder height, squat down by bending your knees, leaning forward at the waist while keeping your back flat and your knees tracking behind your toes
  3. Squat until your thighs are parallel to the ground.
  4. Press up through your heels to return to starting position.

5. Single-Leg Deadlifts

The single-leg deadlift is the ideal slow-burn move for building strong hamstrings and glutes, which can help you tackle steep hills with ease.

This exercise can also improve your balance and boost your stability.

Proper Form

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mG-Stc3c7N0

  1. Start by holding two dumbbells or a weighted bar in front of your body.
  2. While standing tall, shift your weight to your right foot
  3. Hinge forward by slightly bending your right knee and raising your left foot behind you in line with your torso, letting the weights hang down
  4. Lower the weight while keeping it close to the tops of the legs.
  5. Once the weight goes past your knee, pause, then return to the starting position.

6. The Pistol

Also known as the one-legged squat, the pistol is a powerful squat variation that builds strength and balance in your lower body.

If you have issues with lower body flexibility or mobility, use a chair or a bench for the assisted pistol option. That’s how I got pretty decent at doing pistols.

Proper Form

  1. Standing tall, balance on your right foot,
  2. Squat down by bending at the knee and sitting your hips back.
  3. Once your right knee is at about a 90-degree angle, push back up by extending your leg to starting position.s

7. Rotational Shoulder Press

This move is ideal for targeting your upper body muscles, with the emphasis on the shoulder and core muscles.

Proper Form

  1. While standing tall with your feet hip-width apart, hold a pair of dumbbells just outside your shoulders.
  2. As you press the weights up with your right hand, rotate your body to the right side.
  3. Lower the weights to your shoulder as you rotate back to the center, then rotate to the left as you press your left again upward this time.

weight training for runners

 

Weight Lifting For Runners  – The Conclusion

There you have it ! The above weight training for runners guidelines all you need to help you prevent overuse injuries and increase athletic performance without logging in more miles. The rest is up to you.

Please feel free to leave your comments and questions in the section below.

In the meantime thank you for reading my post

Keep Running Strong

David D.

The Greatest 72 Running Tips Of All Time

Looking for the best running tips on the web? Then you have come to the right place.

Whether you’re a beginner runner, a weekend warrior, or a seasoned athlete, the following running guidelines can help you improve your performance, prevent injury, and reach your fitness goals.

What’s not to like!

Let’s dive in.

dive-in-running-

To become a runner, you need to start running.

It’s that simple, period.  Accept the challenge and do your best—even if it scares the hell out of.

Think-in-Time,-not-Distance-runining

If you are a beginner runner, then you need to think in minutes, not miles.

Shoot for a 30-minute run while opting for the walk/run method.

Once you can run for up to 30-minute with ease and without taking breaks, then aim to up the ante.

Run-and-Talk

To make sure that you are running at a comfortable pace, take the ‘run-talk’ test.

If you can keep a conversation going with your buddy while running without much trouble, then you are opting for the right beginner running pace.

Pick-the-Right-Pair

Yes, you can walk in your running shoes, but you just can’t run in your walking shoes, period.

So do yourself a solid and get the right pair.

Spend at least $50 on a good pair.

It should last you at least 500 miles.

Wiggle-Room

When purchasing a running shoe, make sure that they are wider and longer than your bigger foot—your dominant side.

Also, steer clear of pointed shoes and always seek the advice of a specialist when in doubt.

Get-Warmed-running

Breaking into a fast running pace is the recipe for premature fatigue, even injury.

As a result, start your runs right and do a warm-up.

I usually start my runs with a 5-minute jog.

If I feel any tightness or soreness in my muscles, then I gently stretch it away.

Cool-it-Down-running

Rushing back to the real world with too much gusto after a run is a big mistake.

Instead, invest time in a proper cool-down by taking at least  10 minutes to stretch, relax your body and contemplate on what you have just completed.

Listen-to-Your-Body

Keep a keen ear on how your body felt both during and after a run.

Doing so can help you avert trouble and can set you in the right direction toward achieving your running goals.

Try My Beginner Guide

If you’re looking for a simple guide on how to start running, lose weight, and stay injury free, then make sure to check out my Runners Blueprint System!

My system was specially designed for beginners who either want to start running or take their training to the next level, but have little clue on how to do it.

And don’t worry, my ebook is written in a conversational, jargon-free, style.

All you need to do is download it, follow the simple instructions, then start seeing results ASAP.

Here’s what it includes :

  • How to quickly and easily get started running (it’s indeed is easier than you’d think!)
  • How fast (or slow) should you go on your first sessions
  • The exact 13 questions you need to answer before you a buy a running shoe
  • The seven most common running injuries….how to deal with them before they progress into major ones!
  • The quick standing stretching routine that keeps you flexible even if you’re busy as hell
  • The 10-minute warm-up you must do before any session to get the most of your training
  • And much, much more.

 Click HERE to get started with The Runners Blueprint System today!

K.I.S.S-running

“keep it simple, stupid” should be your motto when it comes to training—whether you are prepping for your first 5K or about to compete in an ultra marathon adventure.

Build-the-Base-running

The right foundation can take you a long way.

After building it, then you can move on to adding hill reps, pace work, speedwork, and eventually race strategy.

Just be sure to have the right foundation first.

Step-Back

Building up mileage is not an upward straight arrow.

In fact, every third or fourth week of training, you should cut back on mileage to recover.

Injecting recovery week into your training program can help you dodge overtraining—with all its vows—and stay on track for the long haul.

See-the-Big-Picture-running

Work on increasing your total body strength—especially the core. Work also on your mobility, flexibility and balance.

Think in wholesome terms and your fitness and health will be forever in your debt.

Shoot-for-10-Miles-running

Reaching a weekly mileage of about 10 miles per week can significantly boost your aerobic capacity- and help you ward off heart trouble.

10 miles is the benchmark—you can always add more once you’ve built the lung power.

Embrace-Junk-Miles-running

Junk miles are not just junk.

Those slow miles done during warm-ups or recovery days play a vital role as well.

Junk miles can shed some serious calories and grant you the mind focus you need to work on improving your running form, plus other fitness and health benefits.

Open-mind-running

Just because you can run a 10-miler without breaking a sweat does not mean that you go can through a 8 X 400m on the track at a fast pace—unscathed.

That’s why you need to always keep a beginner mind when approaching a new running training method. Stay humble, and you’ll surely achieve progress.

Leave-the-Comfort-Zone

Doing all of your workouts in the comfort zone is comfortable, but it’ll not help you improve much.

That’s why you would need to step out of your comfort zone and embrace quality training.

You just need to find the sweet spot—challenging but healthy.

Quarter-Quality

If you run, let’s say 20 miles per week, then be sure to log at least 4 to 6 miles of quality miles.

These miles will boost your aerobic capacity and help you run faster, further with less fatigue.

Embrace-the-hills-running

Hills are runners’ worst nightmare, but they are exactly what the doctor ordered.

Hill work is the best form of resistance training that there is, and can also help you run faster and improve your running mechanics and form.

All this while lessening the risks of injury.

Fartlek-it-Up-running

Fartlek training is a less structured form of interval training that was developed in the 1930s.

It’s simple, start with a warm-up jog, run flat out, jog for recovery, then sprint again without following a strict distance recipe.

Sprint and jog on feel, not on benchmarks. Image

Keep-Track-running

Start a training log and keep track of your quantifiable gains (and losses).

This is the best way to shed light on darker aspects of your training so you can judge what needs to stay and/or to go.

Learn-From-Your-Mistakes-running

The best way to find what works the best for you can only happen through embracing the trial and error process.

Our mistakes show us the road to success, period.

Ignoring the feedback you get from your training is the biggest mistake you can ever make, so learn from it and make the right adjustments and you’ll improve.

Clone-Success-running

Success varies from one person to the next, and once you find what works the best for you, you need to keep it up by building a ritual around it.

Repeat it as habitually as possible until it’s a part of your training program.

You don’t need to reinvent the wheel.

Test-Yourself-running

To improve your running, you ought to measure it.

And the best way to do so is via regularly testing yourself.

Compete in races as part of a plan to test your fitness level, progression and race pace.

Do regular test runs to see if you are improving or slacking.

Additional resource – Guide to running lingo

Relax-Man-running

Keep your body fully relaxed throughout the running session.

Breathe deeply, keep your shoulders relaxed and let your jaw hang loose.

Don’t-Crush-the-Butterfly-running

Don’t clench your fists in a tight grip.

Instead, be sure that your fists are loose, thumbs gently resting on the fingers as if you were holding on a delicate butterfly in each palm.

Clenching builds unnecessary tension that leads to discomfort and energy waste.

Move-Your-Arms

From the looks of it, running is solely a lower body activity. But to get efficient with your running, your upper body can also be of help.

That’s why you ought to move your arms more—especially when trying to gain speed.

Just take a look at sprinters, and you’ll get the idea.

Seek-Advice-runningImproving your running style on your own has its limits. In fact, you would need to seek the advice of a specialist—such as a podiatrist or a coach—to help you nail down your running mechanics.

If you can’t afford a specialist, then rub shoulders with elite runners and learn the skill by osmosis.

Become-a-Morning-Runner According to study, those who exercise first thing in the morning tend to stay more consistent with their training programs than those who do it later on.

So, score high points in the consistency game and become an early morning runner.

Believe me; it’s like an addiction.

Once you taste the joys of the morning run, you’ll never be the same.

Lunchtime-Break-Run

If you are not a morning runner, then schedule your runs during your lunchtime breaks.

Noontime running is the perfect break from the workday, and can also ramp up your dose of Vitamin D—the daylight. Plus, it can also help you avoid eating a heavy lunch.

A-Short-Run-is-Better-than-None

If 20 minutes is all you have, then go for it.

A short run is better than none.

This also helps you ingrain the habit of exercising no matter how crazy and chaotic life can be.

Face-Traffic-running

Running against traffic can help you stay alerted and have your eyes opened on any danger you may face.

We all hear about the traffic statistics, so don’t let yourself be just another statistic.

Better safe than sorry.

Vary-Your-Routes-running

Sticking to the same running route is the recipe for boredom.

Instead, be sure to add variety to your training by changing up your running routes regularly.

This will not only help you outrun boredom, but it’s also good for injury prevention and developing proper running mechanics.

Right-Surface-running

Running on hard and uneven surfaces is a major cause of running injury.

So do your body (and knees) a solid and stick to softer surfaces whenever possible.

This can be hard living in urban areas where pavement surfaces are  the norm, but your best to run on proper surfaces.

Starts-in-the-Mind

Top athletes in all fields have a little trick they use to stay top of the game.

Hint: it’s in their heads.

Visualization techniques have the been the staple of mental training for decades, and you should be putting them to good use as well. .

Set-Goals-running

Goals provide clarity and direction.

Plus, they do your motivation wonders.

So set them right and update them regularly.

Better yet, sign up for a challenging race and set your training goals around it.

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Write-and-Rewrite-running-goals

Jotting down your goals on a piece of paper is a must, just don’t write them on stone.

Goals can vary according to your body’s response to training and your aspirations.

So make sure to rewrite and upgrade your goals whenever it’s necessary.

Plus, just the mere act of rewriting a goal can enforce it.

Stay-Realistic-running

Goals are key to success, but when you set unrealistic ones, you are setting the stage for disappointment, and failure and all the enthusiasm can turn into resentment.

That’s why you need to run your goals through a reality check.

Shoot for a reasonable goal and build on it.

Remember, you’ll never know what’s unrealistic until you try it.

Shutter-Excuses-running

Ask any person why they are not running—or not working out in general—and they’ll surely spit out a list of excuses.

I don’t have the time, I’m too old, I don’t know why and so on.

Iif you want to stay on the training track, you have to fight that allegedly logical voice that “manufactures” all that crap.

Find-your-Reasons-running

Why are you running? Come up with at least five reasons and keep them close to heart.

Buddy-Up-running

I owe my training consistency to a long list of running partners. Heck, I was dragged to running by my steadfast cousin.

You should be doing it too.

Instead of venturing down the running path on your own, try to schedule your runs with a training buddy, even a running group.

Do that, and consistency and motivation will come in handy.

Or-Join-a-Club-running

Peer pressure can do your motivation and consistency wonders.

This instinctive force is so powerful that you just can’t resist it, but you have to take the first step by joining a club or a running group.

It can bring out the best in you.

There are plenty of clubs out there, just pick the ones that feel right for you and are a match to your training goals and schedules.

Make-it-Fun-running

I love running because I can make it fun.

It’s like play for me.

Yes, of course, it can get serious when I’m prepping for a race or trying to break a personal record, but if it’s not fun, I wouldn’t be doing for long.

Fun is the road; fitness is merely the result.

But-Go-Solo-at-Other-Times

A training buddy can help you push the pace and stay consistent with your goals, but sometimes going solo is exactly what the doctor ordered.

Going solo is important especially if you are trying to recover from a hard run and don’t want to push the pace.

Going solo is also a great way to be alone with your thoughts on the road, just you and your legs pounding the pavement with no other worries.

Outrun-Boredom

Get out of a training running rut by injecting at least four 30-second pace pickups (not all-out-sprints) on your next 30-minute run.

This will not only help you dodge boredom, but also get your heart rate up and boost your performance.

Run-Naked

Well, not literally, unless you want to spend the night in jail.

Technology based performance tools—think heart monitors, chronometers, GPS tracking and the like—can surely help you improve your performance, but relying heavily on such tools can be counterproductive.

Sometime you ought to run with your imagination.

Run with yourself.

Run with no worry about performance and numbers.

Run naked.

Enjoy-the-Easy-Run

When doing easy runs, take the time to enjoy the scenery.

Smell the roses, breathe deeply, look over the horizon, ap

preciate the beauty that surrounds you, and remember to have fun.

Don’t get trapped in the training-is-everything mindset; otherwise, you’ll definitely get drained out.

Run-to-Music

I just couldn’t go for a run without my music on.

In fact, one of my major reasons to running is listening to music.

Running has become the activity I do just to listen to music. 

So use music to get your mental state up to the challenge.

Stay-in-the-Now

To keep running for the long haul, think in terms of the current moment.

Thinking about your past will make you feel guilty, and thinking about the future will invite worry.

The only moment is the now, and all change can only happen in the now.

Eat-Right-running

Runners of all creeds should follow a well-balanced diet.

Aim to eat about 70 percent carbs, 20 percent protein, and 10 percent fat.

Base your diet around carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, and potatoes since glycogen—a product of carbs—is a vital source of energy on the run.

You would also need the protein for rebuilding damaged muscle tissue and recovery.

Vary-Your-Eating-running

Make sure that you are getting the most bangs out of your diet choices by expanding your nutritional gamut and testing (and tasting) new food each week.

The more varied the colors, the better.

Just keep it healthy.

Water-it-On-running

If you are serious about making the most out of your runs, then hydrate.

Drink plenty of water throughout the day, and if you are planning for a long run, then take a bottle of water with you—this is especially true during summer time.

Don’t-Run-On-an-Empty-Stomach

Make pre-run meals a priority.

About one to two hours before a run, have a small meal to fill up your energy tanks.

Pick what you like; a sports drink, fruit smooth

ie, or even a small sandwich.

Fast,-Low-Fat-Fuel-running

Choose low-fat bars (less than 5 grams) and packing no more than 250 calories.

Gorging on energy bars will only make you fat, even compromise your running.

So be moderate. It’s energy on the go, not a holiday meal.

Post-Run-Eating-is-King

Eating during the recovery window—the hour following a run—is crucial for recovery and energy replenishment.

Choose a mix of carbs and protein to get the most results.

Something like a banana-milk-shake is ideal because it scores high on carbs—essential for replenishing the empty tanks—and protein—the recovery process.

Up-the-Multivitamin-running

Everyone needs a healthy dose of the multivitamins in their lives, but runners need even more thanks to the stresses of exercising.

The high impact nature of running can produce damaging free radicals and may even cause some harm to the red blood cells your feet—that why you would need the multivitamins to take care of the collateral damage.

Iron-as-Well

Iron deficiency can lead to fatigue and other serious health trouble.

The bad news is that runners are more prone to suffer from iron deficiency than the average person.

That’s why you ought to eat plenty of fish, dark meats, liver, eggs, beans, and nuts.

Check-the-Pulse

Overtraining can wreak havoc on performance and health.

But you can ward it off by keeping tabs on your normal heart rate.

If your morning pulse rate is higher than normal— 10 beats or more— then you haven’t recovered from the previous run.

Take time off or back off until it comes down to its regular rate.

Gradual-Progress-is-Key

Going too fast too soon increase your risk of injury and overtraining.

To ward off the trouble, adopt a progressive mindset.

Do as little as possible and build on that.

Think baby steps.

Walk before you run if you have to.

Harder-is-Not-Always-Better

The old motto of ‘no pain, no gain’ may sound tempting to follow, but it’s not always the safe approach when it comes to injury-free running.

Most of the time, pain is just pain and can be counter-productive.

Any one can train himself or herself into the ground.

You should always strive to “get fit without getting hurt”—That’s the motto.

Within-Posts-1---Copie

Building up mileage is not a straight upward arrow.

In fact, every third or fourth week of training, you should cut back on mileage to recover.

Injecting recovery week into your training program can help you dodge overtraining—with all its vows—and stay on track for the long haul.

Just-Move-On

Bad days, bad workouts, injuries, emotional sand pits and the likes are a part of the training life.

Expect them, and when they happen, be sure to get over them as soon as possible.

Allow yourself some time to stew over them, then just let go.

Wallowing in sorrow and self-pity will not get you where you want to go.

Go-Small-running

To train for the marathon, you won’t necessary need endless hours of training.

By running for about 45-minute two times a week, and by incrementally boosting the length of your the long run, you would be able to pull off the 26.2-miler beast.

Have-a-Limit-running

Marathon training can get you into the best cardio shape of your life, but you should learn when to stop.

That’s why you should never run for more than 3 hours straight in training.

Quality always defeats quantity, and marathon training is a fine example.

Be-Willing-to-Rest-running

During marathon training, pains and aches are bound to arise.

Overtraining and most marathon-related injuries can be prevented by just keeping a keen ear on your body and readjusting your training accordingly.

Marathon-Goal(s)-running

To get the most bangs out of your marathon race, don’t keep your eyes on just one goal—pulling it off in less than three hours for instance—but you should develop a range of goals so that can bolster your odds of success.

Taper-Right-running

A great taper period is what will make the difference between a great race and a disaster—especially if you have been putting the sweat in training.

As a result, gradually decrease your training volume in the three weeks before the big day.

Steady-and-Slow-Wins-the-Race

Don’t let race jitters highjack your running pace during the first miles—that can be hard to resist thanks to the race-day adrenaline rush.

Pick up your pace slowly and consciously hold yourself back during the early miles.

Move-On-running-tips

Once you finish a marathon race, take some time to take note of what went right and what was right down awful, then move on.

Just let it go and forget about your last marathon before you sign up for another.

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