First things first, hip flexors are a group of skeletal muscles located in the upper thighs and the pelvis region, linking the legs to the pelvis. These muscles connect the thigh bone—known as the femur—to the pelvis. The primary hip flexor muscles are the psoas major and the iliacus— collectively known as the iliopsoas, which is usually the weakest of all of the muscles. Other hip flexor muscles include the sartorius, tensor fascia latae, and rectus femoris. The Functions These powerful muscles are used in every stride when walking, running, and sprinting. Some of the main functions of hip flexors include:
Imagine yourself enjoying a run on the trails or around the neighborhood when, and out of nowhere, a hostile dog runs up to you at light speed with fangs barred and bad intentions. Do you know what you should do? If your answer is no, then keep on reading… An Encounter of A Doggy Kind As much as I love dogs—and all animals for that matters—I don’t really like being chased, or attacked, by them while running. In fact, dogs can be a runner’s worst nightmare when they go on the offense.
Running is pretty straightforward. Grab a pair of decent shoes and head out the door. In fact, this sport is, without a doubt, one of the world’s most accessible sports of all times. Nonetheless, if you peel back the layers, you’ll find that the running world is full of all sorts of lies, myths, misconceptions and total B.S. just like any other sports industry in the world. As a result, today I decided to debunk some of the most common myths about running so you could know what’s worth believing and what should be taken with a grain of salt—helping you run free of nonsense.
Want to know how to run like a pro runner? If your answer is yes, then keep on reading… Why should you consider training like a pro? The fact is, if you are serious about reaching your full potential, you’ll need to imitate the strategies of those on top—no need to reinvent the wheel. By training like a pro runner, you’ll be able, without a shadow of a doubt, to achieve your running best.
Enter Mental Training For Runners One of the subjects that I’m interested in but haven’t written about diligently, is the subject of mental training for runners--especially what makes a runner mentally strong. Therefore, in today’s post, I’m gonna share with you some of my best advice when it comes to building and maintaining mental toughness for your runs (and for the rest of your life). So why mental toughness is so critical, and how can we develop more of it (without hiring some expensive life coach)?
Running is one of the most popular and common ways to getting in shape and losing weight. In fact, chances you are a runner yourself (or thinking of becoming one) since you just ended up on my blog, reading this post about running. But its benefits go beyond the scale. In fact, running has the power to prevent a plethora of diseases and just might the best medicine. Well, I’m not saying that because I love running, nor is it because I devoted this whole blog and a significant portion of my life to it. But it’s because science is on my side. Research has shown that regular running can help prevent cardiovascular disease, stroke, mental decline, some cancers, type 2 diabetes and a myriad of other health problems. Therefore, today I decided to share with you some of the current scientific proven benefits of running.
Are you looking to take your running to the next level? Looking for a good way to mix your running workouts and add a new challenge and twist to your training program? Or are you just bored with your regular running routine? Then why not give trail running a try and be one with nature. The fact is, trail running is awesome, and its physical and mental benefits are—beyond the shadow of a doubt—undeniable. Therefore, if you have a been a consistent “city”, on-road kinda of a runner, and are thinking about heading off to the beaten track, then keep on reading. Trail running is simple, but taking your first few steps can be really intimidating. But fret no more. This awesome guide will teach you how to start trail running right, avoid injury or burnout, stay safe for the long haul and make the most out of every trail workout you do. So are you ready to discover the wild soothing side of running? Then here we go… Trail Running Demystified
We are in the month of May, and May happens to be the National Bike Month. Therefore, and for that occasion, I decided today to write something up about some of the many benefits of cycling for runners. Therfore, I encourage you to give cycling a try—especially after you get acquainted with the many benefits that cycling has to offer runners, and how simple it is to start biking. I hope you’ll find them useful and simple enough.
I have been running for the last 10 years, but I wasn’t born with an I-Love-Running gene. And truth be told, running for me wasn't love at first sight. In fact, I used to “not like” it so much (even hated it at occasions) when I took it up for the first few months. As a result, today my dear readers, I wanted to share with some of the practical strategies and action steps that helped me fall in love with running and stay so for the past few years. So are you ready? Then here we go…
This is my fourth detailed guide to common running injuries. In the first three blog posts, I covered runners knee and ITBS and ankle sprains, and today I am sharing with you, dear readers, my complete guide to the common condition known as shin splints. Shin Splints are Everywhere Shin splints are some of the most common running injuries of all times. I have had it in the past, multiple times, and I haven’t yet come across a runner who didn’t suffer through it at some point in their running career. Obviously, shin splints are more widespread among runners, especially beginners, and long-distance runners. Not only that, shin splints are also pretty common among dancers, gymnasts and military recruits, according to the National Institute of Health.